Gallery view

1930

Du Bois, W. E. B. (William Edward Burghardt), 1868-1963

The choice of Hercules From "the Pagan bible" in "Xenophon's memoirs"

As in mums312-b236-i004, a Herculean figure faces a fork in the road of life, and in his hesitation, is advised alternately by "happiness" and "vice" personified, who essentially outline their respective effects on human nature and society.

W. E. B. Du Bois Papers

1906

Du Bois, W. E. B. (William Edward Burghardt), 1868-1963

The jewel

A porter tells of once receiving a fine jewel from a somnambulant passenger and the rather strange aftermath on a railroad trip to Atlanta, only to ultimately admit that he's embellished his tale, and that it is all true, except that part about "the jewel." See mums312-b236-i036 for later draft; mums312-b236-i053, i054 for scraps and fragments.

W. E. B. Du Bois Papers

1900

Du Bois, W. E. B. (William Edward Burghardt), 1868-1963

For Charles

A man named Herbert Querdolyn has a series of dreams about the leaders he fought for; confronts a beautiful girl he sees in a vision; discusses his lineage and his interlocutors' affection for Italy; addresses his sacrifice of his birthright; and dies, leaving his name and legacy for future generations.

W. E. B. Du Bois Papers

1905

Du Bois, W. E. B. (William Edward Burghardt), 1868-1963

The Princess Steel

Previously titled "The Megascope; a tale of tales," a fabulous tale of a "crank" sociologist who's invented a megascope through which to see "the Far Great and the Near Small but not the Great Near"; and an encounter with a Princess Steel and other fantastical characters only seen or heard by the husband. Littered very lightly by Du Bois's editorial corrections. See also mums31... more

W. E. B. Du Bois Papers

1955

Du Bois, W. E. B. (William Edward Burghardt), 1868-1963

Mr. Hedley's option

Lawyer John Weston and his schoolteacher girlfriend Mary swiftly solve two murders, unraveling an intrigue surrounding the trade of a real estate option and the wealth a nephew (Frank) stands to gain from the uncle (Hedley) killed not by him himself, but by his car; Frank regains his innocence, but loses all financial prospects, and his fiancé.

W. E. B. Du Bois Papers

1906

Du Bois, W. E. B. (William Edward Burghardt), 1868-1963

Down to Jericho

Atlanta (Ga.) - A beaten-down entrepreneur gets advice from a Pullman porter and tackles the automobile trust that had previously robbed him of his idea and according patent, finding love on the way, and by train no less. See mums312-b236-i039 through i041 for alternate drafts; i042 for outline.

W. E. B. Du Bois Papers

1906

Du Bois, W. E. B. (William Edward Burghardt), 1868-1963

The Java plot

A stranger of ambiguous race describes plans to finance native revolts in the colonies; our skeptical first-person narrator converses with him, plans to double-cross him, and years later, sees no fruits from his scheme. Previously called "The Congo Plot"; see mums312-b236-i046.

W. E. B. Du Bois Papers

1955

Du Bois, W. E. B. (William Edward Burghardt), 1868-1963

The necklace of emeralds

A man tries hard not to fall for a cunning and stunning jewel smuggler over dinner, as two policemen look on, and she explains her smuggling intrigue, her ideas on marriage, and her mysterious and criminal past.

W. E. B. Du Bois Papers

1905

Du Bois, W. E. B. (William Edward Burghardt), 1868-1963

The Princess Steel

Previously titled "The Megascope; a tale of tales," a fabulous tale of a "crank" sociologist who's invented a megascope through which to see "the Far Great and the Near Small but not the Great Near"; and an encounter with a Princess Steel and other fantastical characters only seen or heard by the husband. This version bears some editorial corrections by Du Bois. See also mums31... more

W. E. B. Du Bois Papers

1900

Du Bois, W. E. B. (William Edward Burghardt), 1868-1963

The thief

A tale of a man who, after contemplating suicide in a state of impending financial ruin, feigns his own death so as to provide for his wife and child, and ultimately concocts another scheme to be reunited with them, "in the desert of paradise, far away from other people."

W. E. B. Du Bois Papers