49 results found for: subject:"African Americans--History"

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1961

Du Bois, W. E. B. (William Edward Burghardt), 1868-1963

Negro history, 800-1961

United States - Typed draft of unpublished article discussing the history of "the Negro" starting from 800 through the "rape of Africa to establish slave labor in America;" discusses socialism and communism and their effect on "the American Negroes."

W. E. B. Du Bois Papers

1954 Apr. 24

Du Bois, W. E. B. (William Edward Burghardt), 1868-1963

Africa and Afro-America

New York (N.Y.) - Typed draft with notes and corrections of speech given to the Council on African Affairs' Working Conference in Support of African Liberation concerning United States foreign relations with Africa, conditions in Africa, and colonialism and colonization in Africa and worldwide.

W. E. B. Du Bois Papers

1954 Feb. 4

Du Bois, W. E. B. (William Edward Burghardt), 1868-1963

The future of the American Negro [fragment]

New York (N.Y.) - Typed draft with notes and corrections of speech given at the Jefferson School in New York concerning the history and future of the "American Negro," including Reconstruction. Argues that the future of the "American Negro" "depends upon planned economy, the development of art and literature, and an understanding of socialism."

W. E. B. Du Bois Papers

1954 Feb. 4

Du Bois, W. E. B. (William Edward Burghardt), 1868-1963

The future of the American Negro

New York (N.Y.) - Typed draft with notes and corrections of speech given at the Jefferson School in New York concerning the history and future of the "American Negro," including Reconstruction. Argues that the future of the "American Negro" "depends upon planned economy, the development of art and literature, and an understanding of socialism."

W. E. B. Du Bois Papers

1960 May

Du Bois, W. E. B. (William Edward Burghardt), 1868-1963

Insanity

United States - Printed in National Guardian. Du Bois voices his concern over his "crazy nation," that "deliberately distorts history," though admits to feeling "uplifted by the revolt of Negro students in America;" Argues for civil rights and discusses United States history and the use of propaganda. Notes the upcoming elections and insists on the importance of senators and congressman. Publ... more

W. E. B. Du Bois Papers

1954 Apr. 24

Du Bois, W. E. B. (William Edward Burghardt), 1868-1963

Africa and Afro-America

New York (N.Y.) - Typed draft of speech given to the Council on African Affairs' Working Conference in Support of African liberation concerning United States foreign relations with Africa, conditions in Africa, and colonialism and colonization in Africa and worldwide.

W. E. B. Du Bois Papers

1940

Du Bois, W. E. B. (William Edward Burghardt), 1868-1963

The struggle of black folk for civil rights in the United States

United States - Typed draft of unpublished article exploring the history behind the struggle for civil rights.

W. E. B. Du Bois Papers

1954 Apr. 24

Du Bois, W. E. B. (William Edward Burghardt), 1868-1963

Africa and Afro-America

New York (N.Y.) - Typed draft with notes and corrections of speech given to the Council on African Affairs' Working Conference in Support of African Liberation concerning United States foreign relations with Africa, conditions in Africa, and colonialism and colonization in Africa and worldwide.

W. E. B. Du Bois Papers

1960 May

Du Bois, W. E. B. (William Edward Burghardt), 1868-1963

Insanity

United States - Printed in National Guardian. Du Bois voices his concern over his "crazy nation," that "deliberately distorts history," though admits to feeling "uplifted by the revolt of Negro students in America;" Argues for civil rights and discusses United States history and the use of propaganda. Notes the upcoming elections and insists on the importance of senators and congressman. Publ... more

W. E. B. Du Bois Papers

1957 Apr. 30

Du Bois, W. E. B. (William Edward Burghardt), 1868-1963

The American Negro and the darker world

New York (N.Y.) - Typed draft with notes and corrections of a speech given to the National Committee to Defend Negro Leadership, as well as the Commencement Address of Allen University, concerning this history of the "American Negro," colonial imperialism, and labor movements. Discuses United States relations with the Soviet Union and the role of socialism.

W. E. B. Du Bois Papers