Gallery view

1966 Sept. 14

Entin, David Hudson

Mr. Ho-Can

Qu?ng Ngãi (Vietnam) - Typed on pink carbon paper with no greeting. Telling the story of Mr. Ho-Can, Entin's tutor and USAID employee teaching English. Fought against French with Vi?t Minh until he became disillusioned. Forced to attend indoctrination classes, he was "the slowest student," tricking Vi?t Minh into "thinking he was a very ignorant peasant."

David Entin Papers

1967 Oct. 6

Entin, David Hudson

Political happenings

Qu?ng Ngãi (Vietnam) - Typed on typewriter paper. Election was narrowly validated by populace. Recounts recent demonstrations by students and Tri Quang or militant Buddhists. In Qu?ng Ngãi, three humdred Revolutionary Development cadre marched on the province headquartes denouncing corruption. Subsequently Dr. Hoanh, the only civilian province chief, lost his job.

David Entin Papers

1967 Apr. 4

Entin, David Hudson

War

Qu?ng Ngãi (Vietnam) - Typed on typewriter paper. Describes the intensifying military effort in Qu?ng Ngãi province and the destructiveness of the war. Allies planned to trap a reported VC battalion, but the VC buried all their weapons and disguised themselves as locals, slipping away from the Allied forces. Every military operation generates refugess. There are friendly-fire incidents that compound problems. Visited a hosp... more

David Entin Papers

1967 May 15

Entin, David Hudson

Changes in Vietnam

Qu?ng Ngãi (Vietnam) - Typed on typewriter paper. After spending a week in Manila, Entin observes many changes in the American conception and operation of "this War." General Westmoreland was delegated responsibility for Revolutionary Development program, with Robert Komer as deputy. Sees dangerous trend manifesting of impatient military displacing local government.

David Entin Papers

1967 Mar. 11

Entin, David Hudson

Observations

Qu?ng Ngãi (Vietnam) - Typed on typewriter paper. Gives account of flying in helicopter over Qu?ng Ngãi province. Interviewed a "young fellow" for a job as interpreter-translator, asked him what he thought of Viet Cong and was surprised and moved by his answer.

David Entin Papers

1967 July 31

Entin, David Hudson

The northern reaches

Qu?ng Ngãi (Vietnam) - Typed on typewriter paper. Concerning two trips to the northernmost provinces in south Vietnam. Visited Hue, a distinctly orderly city with large beautiful houses. Helicoptered to Quang Tri, the northernmost province in the South. Describes visit to famed "street without joy," used as title of Bernard Fall's book about the military history of the French-Indochine War, which Entin summarizes. They trav... more

David Entin Papers

1967 May 20

Entin, David Hudson

Qu?ng Ngãi in the spring: the dry season

Qu?ng Ngãi (Vietnam) - Typed on typewriter paper. Spent past week in the field. Temperatures over 100 degrees. Everywhere people are threshing the grain. After flooding monsoons, everything is now scorched dry. Describes methods of irrigation peasants use. Sees the rice culture as describing the rhythm and life cycle of Vietnam.

David Entin Papers

1967 Apr. 1

Entin, David Hudson

Rewarding experiences

Qu?ng Ngãi (Vietnam) - Typed on pink and white typewriter paper (one sheet each) with no greeting. Recounts meeting a District Chief who stressed honesty in goverance. Also describes inspiring visit to a refugee camp run by a religious sect, Cao Dai, that had evening English classes which were well attended and gratifying to see after Engin had worked so hard to persuade the Education Service Chief to begin adult literacy c... more

David Entin Papers

1968 Feb. 4

Entin, David Hudson

Vietnam catastrophe, Tet, 1968

Qu?ng Ngãi (Vietnam) - Typed on typewriter paper. Reaction to the Tet offensive, the "all-out, well-planned and connected effort." Notes twenty or so American civilians and AID guys missing and that psychological toll is greater than physical damage. Puzzled by the degree to which Viet Cong can sustain loses.

David Entin Papers

1967 Apr. 10

Entin, David Hudson

Tolerance

Qu?ng Ngãi (Vietnam) - Typed on typewriter paper. Concerning catching two men cheating on a test given for jobs as interpreters. Initially Entin judges them harshly, but upon reflection wonders how many upstanding Americans could maintain their moral superiority given the same dire circumstances.

David Entin Papers